HP 14-an013nr laptop

Installing an SSD in an HP 14-an013nr laptop

A client asked me, a few days ago, to upgrade the existing 32GB SSD in her relatively new laptop to a SAMSUNG 256GB SSD. My first thoughts were “easy; take off a few screws, install new SSD; clone old SSD to new; ready”.

This laptop is quite easy to disassemble.

  1. Lay the laptop on a flat surface upside down (with the lid on the bottom)
  2. Unscrew all screws you see. There are 8 screws visible
  3. Take out the battery to reveal 2 more screws
  4. Remove the 2 rubber feet on each side of the battery, to reveal 4 more screws (2 under each foot)
  5. Turn the laptop right side up and open the lid
  6. Insert a plastic pry tool between the top and bottom parts of the case. I suggest starting on the right side (VGA connector on the left protrudes through the plastic case) and working your way around the case
  7. Lift the top part of the case, with all the electronics and display, clear of the case and set it on the table
Screw locations on the bottom case (8 visible + 2 under battery +2 under rubber feet)
Screw locations on the bottom case (8 visible + 2 under battery +2 under rubber feet)
One of the screws under the battery
One of the screws under the battery

 

 

 

 

 

 

A plastic pry tool inserted between the bottom and top parts of the case. (Chips and scratches preexistent ;) )
A plastic pry tool inserted between the bottom and top parts of the case. (Chips and scratches preexistent ;) )
The VGA connector protruding from the side of the case. Start unclipping the case from the other side and "slide" it over the connectors
The VGA connector protruding from the side of the case. Start unclipping the case from the other side and “slide” it over the connectors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The laptop innards. Keyboard, screen and motherboard are all one unit
The laptop innards. Keyboard, screen and motherboard are all one unit

After taking the laptop apart, I discovered that HP didn’t use a conventional connector for the built in SSD. Instead of the “normal” SATA connector they used a flat-flex cable to connect the SSD to the motherboard.  A search on the internet revealed that there exists an adapter to convert from a standard SATA connector to the flat-flex connector on the motherboard, but at $60 I was not prepared to order it.

The FFC used to connect the existing SSD to the motherboard.
The FFC used to connect the existing SSD to the motherboard
The mini-SATA connector for the DVD drive
The mini-SATA connector for the DVD drive

 

 

 

 

 

 

Looking at the laptop I noticed there was a slimline SATA connector on the motherboard at what looked like a place for a DVD drive, although this particular model didn’t have the relevant cut-out on the case. So I decided to use a caddy to connect the SSD to the laptop. These caddies are used to replace the DVD in a laptop with a hard drive and are quite cheap.

The caddy with the new SSD placed inside the laptop
The caddy with the new SSD placed inside the laptop

After that it was a simple matter of cloning Windows to the new SSD and changing the boot device. I decided to leave the original SSD in place as extra storage, as it would do no harm and I didn’t feel goo leaving an FFC flapping around in the breeze.

 

Links:

Leave a Reply

Content not available.
Please allow cookies by clicking Accept on the banner

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.